Posts Tagged ‘device’

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A Simple Product With All the Features

March 11, 2009

I’ve been writing about keeping products simple. It makes your product easier to use for the majority of users. However, what about the users that don’t want simple? How do you keep them excited about your product?

I want to talk about cameras for a moment, as I’ve found them to be a good example of products that might have a good balance of everything. There’s no question that digital SLR’s (single lens reflex) cameras take better pictures than their point-and-shoot counterparts. They have larger, better quality CCD’s and better lenses. For the advanced users, it’s also easier to quickly adjust such features as shutter speeds and F-stops. Point-and-shoots are meant for convenience; they fit neatly in your pocket so you always have it handy. 

However, if you delve into the manual settings for a point-and-shoot (I have had good experiences with a few of the products in the Canon Powershot lineup) you might find ways to tweak your photos for better results and get more functionality from your camera. I like to play with the depth of field, using focus to highlight my target instead of location within the frame or lighting. I’ve also been experimenting with white-balance. I’ve found those two features alone have dramatically improved my ability to capture the moment. My Canon SD750 even has the ability to setup hotkeys, so I can get into the white-balance menu with one key-press instead of navigating the function-tree. 

Even though I’ve been stressing the importance of keeping products simple, they should only be as simple as they need to be. In the case of my camera, sometimes I want to just grab a quick picture of my kids doing something goofy, and I don’t want to worry about setting up a shot. Other times, I’d really like to get an image with more character, and I’m glad I have a camera that has a multitude of manual features. 

What products are you using that work well for both the novice user and the advanced hobbiest?

An appetizer: Figs topped with chevre and wrapped in prosciutto. Photo taken on the Automatic settings.

An appetizer: Figs topped with chevre and wrapped in prosciutto. Photo taken with the Automatic settings - auto focus, flash, 77mm focal length (35mm equiv.), f-stop (f/4.0) and exposure (1/60).

 

 

The same appetizer taken with Manual settings. No flash, ISO 80, Macro focal adjustment.

The same appetizer taken with Manual settings. No flash, f/2.8, exposure (1/40), 37mm focal length (35mm equiv.).

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You don’t need to buy a Hybrid car for better mileage

February 26, 2009

pumpinggas I’ve been driving a Toyota Prius for over a year now.  Gas prices have been jumping up and down, but I’ve definitely been pleased with the car overall. However, if you’re not already in the market for a new car, maybe you can get better mileage with the car you have. 

Yes, the Prius gets great mileage. I generally get between 44mpg and 54mpg depending on the time of year and the type of driving. However, when I first bought the car, it was closer to 38mpg to 42mpg. The improvement came because the car has an on-board smart-meter that provides immediate feedback about the relationship between your driving behavior and gas mileage. By the way, that’s an improvement of 10% – 20% just based on my driving habits. 

So, what would happen if you could tame the jack-rabbit starts, go easy on the gas-pedal, and keep it under 70mph? Could you effectively knock $0.20 to $0.40 off each gallon of gas you buy this month? In combination with other common practices (properly inflated tires, a clean air filter, and a tune up), maybe.

Have other Prius drivers found the same to be true? Do other hybrid vehicles have similar smart-meters? What’s your take?

Photo credit: Futureatlas.com

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Notes from “Plug into the SmartGrid”

February 17, 2009
Andy Karsner

Andy Karsner - Policy Panel

Washington, DC Feb 17, 2009 –  Every seat in the auditorium at Google’s DC office was filled with people passionate about bringing about change in the way power is distributed. People even lined the back wall and the overflow room. A total of 500 people in attendance. The event format was split into two industry panels, the first discussing the technology requirements for a SmartGrid and the second focused more on the Federal and State policy initiatives required to properly implement such a sweeping technological plan.

Tomorrow afternoon, the ~2-1/2 hour video footage of the panels will be available on both Google’s DotOrg channel as well as GE’s YouTube channel. If you don’t have time to watch, here are my notes from the event. I’m sure I missed some details, so please correct me or submit your comments.

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Google To Give The Energy Sector A Jumpstart

February 13, 2009

windpower_hdrThis week, Google announced they’re Beta testing a new application that you can use to track your household (or business) energy use by device in an effort to cut energy usage. Google PowerMeter will break down your energy usage almost in real-time. According to their data, the clothes-line may be due for a comeback. As the old adage goes,

“If you can not measure it, you can not improve it.” – Lord Kelvin

They’ve built the application, but now they’re looking to develop some hardware to go with it. Google is not the only player in the game, though. Pepco is also looking to develop Smart Meters in the DC suburbs, and Agilewaves, comprised of a trio of NASA engineers, developed similar technology after the wave of California’s rolling blackouts in 2006. Even with a decent head-start, it might be hard to beat the raw initiative, seemingly unlimited cash reserves, and amazing grasp of user interfaces that Google has shown time after time. 

Last fall, Google and GE announced a partnership aimed at pushing technology and policy in the energy sector. To kick off the initiative, they’ll both be hosting Plug Into The Smart Grid next Tuesday at 2pm EST. The event appears to be open to the public, but plan for attendance to be maxed. Instead of making you fight the crowds, though, they’ll be posting the  content within 24 hours of the presentations on both Google’s DotOrg channel as well as GE’s YouTube channel. Google has also invited everyone to submit and vote on questions in advance via Google Moderator. This event appears to have some big players, so it’s not exactly a grass-roots effort. But, everyone is going to be called upon to act eventually. Now is a good time to start paying attention. 

Program

  • Introduction and welcome 
    • Dan Reicher, Director of Climate Change and Energy Initiatives, Google.org
    • Bob Gilligan, Vice President, GE Energy
       
  • Part I: Envisioning smart power
    Energy tools and technologies to empower people with information and choice    

    • Moderator: Bob Gilligan, GE
    • Adrian Tuck, CEO, Tendril
    • Ron Binz, Chairman, Colorado Public Utilities Commission
    • Jeff Renaud, Director, Ecomagination, GE
    • Ed Lu, Advanced Projects, Google
    • Kelly Speakes-Backman, Principal, RE+GENeration Consultants LLC
    • George Bjelovuk, Managing Director, American Electric Power
       
  • Break
     

Part II: Accelerating the energy revolution
State and federal policies to drive smart power
Opening remarks: The Honorable Carol Browner, Assistant to the President for Energy and Climate Change (invited)  

  • Moderator: Dan Reicher, Google
  • Fred Butler, President, National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners
  • John Podesta, President, Center for American Progress (invited)
  • Andy Karsner, Former Ass. Sec. for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, U.S. Department of Energy
  • Chris Miller, Office of Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid

Photo Credit: John Nyberg

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Preparing for the Digital TV Transition

February 11, 2009

digital_worldI get most of my news and entertainment online instead of through the television. But, we still turn on the weather or PBS cartoons in the morning, so we needed to prepare for the upcoming “digital transition”. Here’s a summary of how I chose a converter box and built an antenna. Did I miss anything? What did you do?

As you’ve probably heard, Congress and the FCC are requiring full-power television broadcasters to drop their analog signal and go completely digital. The date for this transition was originally scheduled to be February 17, 2009, but it was postponed recently to June 12, 2009. According to the FCC, they plan to use the “discarded” analog spectrum for public safety communications (fire, police, rescue squads, etc.) as well as auction off portions to private companies for the expansion of more advanced wireless programs such as wireless broadband. Regardless of why Congress has federally mandated a technological shift for television broadcasting, it appears to be happening. Even with the postponement, there is no reason for you to wait.

Note: If you’re a cable/FIOS/Satellite subscriber, you don’t need to worry. The digital transition is only for over-the-air (OTA), broadcast television that you’d pick up with an antenna. 

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Strive for a simple design

February 4, 2009

There are a lot of ways to solve a problem, but it seems like many of them are more complicated than they need to be. You start by satisfying one design criteria. Then you tackle the rest of them, one-by-one, until the problem is completed. Unfortunately, you may end up with a Frankenstein product that’s difficult to use and ugly.

The best design, the one to strive for, is the simplest one. This is the one where everything fits together and works. It’s easy to use and elegant. It makes you hit your head and say, “Why didn’t I think of that?!” As an engineer, I’m impressed by simplicity just because it is so hard to achieve. I’m always considering it as the ideal solution, something to aspire to.

chessyoutriggers

Homegrown outriggers - CAD rendering

“Good design is as little design as possible.
Less but better – because it concentrates on the essential aspects, and the products are not burdened with inessentials. Back to purity, back to simplicity!”
– Dieter Rams

“Everything should be as simple as possible, but not simpler!”
– Albert Einstein

I am usually found within the electro-mechanical device sphere, but I can appreciate good design principles wherever they happen to show up. I keep thinking about something I saw while fishing for Rockfish on the Chesapeake Bay last Spring. I can’t find anything online about it, so I thought I’d share. I’m not a fisherman, so you’ll have to excuse any incorrect terminology. I had seen fishing outriggers that were long rigid poles that stick out from the boat sides and the fishing line attached along the length, like these. They keep the lines wider apart so you can have more lines in the water without tangling.

On this boat, though, they had outriggers that were a couple of wood planks mounted together with threaded rod. A line is attached to the eye-bolt at the front and it’s dropped off the boat. As the boat drags it, the water rushes past the planks and forces the outrigger away from the boat until the angle, rushing water, and mainline reach an equilibrium. Attach your fishing lines to the mainline using shower-curtain hoops. When a fish bites and drags the line, it breaks free of the hoop. It’s as simple as can be, and you can build a pair for around $50, I’d guess. After-market outriggers go for $500 and up, plus there’s professional installation and maintenance.

I’m not all that impressed by “cheap and dirty” solutions, even when I use them myself. For the most part, they’re just enough to get by when you can’t come up with the right solution. However, even though these are inexpensive outriggers, they’re also easy to install, can reach out 50′ to 100′ off the boat without any modifications, and don’t raise your height into the local bridges. They might be better than the “real thing”!

picture-011

Photo credit: Alex Flamm

Unfortunately, I didn’t think to get a picture of the setup, so I created a CAD model from memory. It may need a bit of tweaking to work properly. I’m guessing the 2″ x 12″ boards are 36″ long, and it’s about as wide assembled. Remember to use stainless hardware and boards that float.

I’m interested to hear if anyone knows the origin of these things or how well they really stack-up against mounted outriggers. All of the other boats in the marina seemed to have them, but maybe it’s just a local thing.

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Designing an anal probe

December 24, 2008

If someone offered to pay you to design an anal probe, would you do it? I once made the decision to, and my life was never the same again. It turned out to be a very interesting project with a lot of mechanical challenges, and by the time my prostate turns 50, hopefully that work will have meant something. “How about some details?”, you ask. Just a second.

Since I design a lot of medical devices at Key Tech, there are definitely going to be projects coming across my desk that might make some people squirm. It certainly made me, at first, but this was not to be my last work in anal probes. I have since worked on the design of an endoscopic tool to treat hemmorhoids and other lesions using infrared coagulation, and I even got to see a couple of relevant procedures performed. I don’t mind designing a device to be inserted into the rectum, stick needles into the brain, or palpate an eyeball, and I always appreciate the chance to observe a real medical procedure. Maybe I have a little bit of morbid curiosity. Yes, I do, but I am also happy to work on cool stuff.

Now, without getting too graphic, a few project details.

Fabricated prototype of the helical transrectal needle insertion device

Fabricated prototype of the helical transrectal needle insertion device for prostate brachytherapy

In grad school, I designed a device that, using trans-rectal ultrasound imaging, could insert a needle through the rectum and into the prostate for the purpose of implanting radioactive “seeds” that kill the cancerous tissue. This procedure, known as brachytherapy, is normally done through the perineum. It’s painful because of a dense cluster of nerves at the site and not very accurate because of the much longer distance between the controlled insertion point and the target location. Our (myself and my advisors) hypothesis was that entering through the rectum would avoid those nerves and decrease the distance to the target, improving patient comfort and procedural accuracy. Preliminary testing on simulated tissue was inconclusive, meaning it wasn’t more accurate than the transperineal approach, but it should decrease pain and healing time. My work never made it to clinical trials, that I know of, so it’s impossible to quantify pain or healing time. That’s the 5-second summary, but if you want to see some calculations and read the details – there are absolutely NO pictures of anyone’s rectum, it’s all completely safe for work – then you can read my paper on the subject, which I also published and presented at ICRA 2004.